Sport and Cultural Studies

Embodied Masculinities in Global Sport

This book acknowledges the central role of bodies in the social construction of gender and, in this case, ideas about masculinity. Editors Jorge Knijnik and Daryl Adair, along with a group of international researchers, articulate how various types of masculinities can be played out in different sports by drawing from personal experiences of athletes, investigating the cultural--and even global--impact of male achievements in sport, and comparing men's experiences in sport to women's.

Sport, Race, and Ethnicity: Narratives of Difference and Diversity

This provocative collection brings together some of the leading historians, sociologists, political scientists, and cultural theorists on an ambitious range of topics dealing with sport, diversity and difference. The book is both diverse and inclusive, for it considered race, ethnicity and aboriginality in tandem; too often these themes are segmented into separate studies. The collection features vibrant examples from different eras, places and spaces - wherein co-themes like post-colonialism, gender and media representation are embedded.

Sport for Development, Peace, and Social Justice

Sport for Development, Peace, and Social Justice goes beyond the individual benefits of sport to look more closely at what sport can offer to groups of people and the communities in which they live. Although the domain of sport development is mostly uncharted, editors Robert Schinke and Stephanie Hanrahan integrate sport development projects from different disciplines to challenge readers to broaden the scope of what they think can be achieved through sport.

Rethinking the Olympics Cultural Histories of the Modern Games

This anthology of essays, previously published in Olympika: The International Journal of Olympic Studies, addresses key themes in the scholarly study of the Games. Part I of Rethinking the Olympics presents seven articles devoted to Olympic history: the Games’ legacy from antiquity, their modern evolution, and the most controversial Games of the modern era, the Berlin Games of 1936. Part II reviews the persistent problems and crises that confounded and defined the Olympic Games over time. The nine essays in this section focus on a variety of issues such as: performance enhancement; the rise of commercialism; enduring controversies in the form of leadership, corruption, and the Cold War; and the politics of hosting Olympic Games. Finally, in Part III, the future of the Modern Olympic Movement is addressed from the perspective of the rapidly accelerating and mushrooming process of globalization.

Reading Baseball: Books, Biographies, and the Business of the Game

Author and scholar Braham Dabscheck muses upon some of baseball's silent yet magnificently important treasures. He examines several topics, including the business of the game (industrial and labor relations, Curt Flood, law, and organized baseball); social commentary biographies (the work of Stephen Jay Gould and Ken Burns, for example); and culture of the game as it spreads across the globe to places like Australia, Japan, and Latin America. This collection of essays is both insightful and remarkable, and is a valuable companion to any enthusiast.

Racism in College Athletics

This substantially revised edition of Racism in College Athletics retains the rich history and context that made the first two editions so widely acclaimed. Yet this third edition not only expands on the hurdles and triumphs of African American student-athletes, but it also examines the injustices toward and successes of coaches, administrators, and international student-athletes.

Long Run to Freedom:Sport, Cultures and Identities in South Africa

The Long Run to Freedom: Sport, Cultures and Identities in South Africa analyzes the meaning attached to sport in South African societies, past and present. It explores the history and changing meanings attached to particular sports in the old and new South Africas, and the ways in which sport is being used in the present. In particular, it examines the prominent team sports of rugby, soccer, and cricket in the creation of social divisions and unities over the course of South African history.

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