Patrick J. Rishe
David Sanders
Jason Reese
and Michael Mondello

In a seminal investigation of secondary pricing for college football bowl games, Rishe, Reese, and Boyle (2015) found Rose Bowl administrators price their face values in the inelastic range of consumer demand, and factors such as pent-up demand, distance traveled, and perceived seat quality impacted the size of secondary markups. Their study, however, lacked a breadth of application because it only focused on two bowl games occurring at the same venue and city. Conversely, this paper uses 9,413 transactions through TicketCity reflecting secondary ticket sales across 55 different bowl games...Read more

Christopher Kemper
Christoph Breuer

Football clubs usually generate revenues from three different sources: broadcasting, commercial activities, and ticket sales (Bühler & Nufer; 2010). In contrast to clubs in the English Premier League, teams in the Bundesliga are unable to capitalize on ticket sales (Nufer & Fischer, 2013). Until now ticket prices in the Bundesliga have been the lowest among Europe’s top five leagues despite its clubs having the highest stadium attendance in European football (Nufer & Fischer, 2013). Yet, revenues from ticket sales are the most controllable stream of income for football clubs,...Read more

Patrick J. Rishe
Michael Mondello
Brett Boyle

Though most academic research on sports pricing finds that sports organizations price their tickets in the inelastic region of consumer demand, most events do not consist of several micro-events contested in different locations where the event participants are not known until days before the event occurs. The Division I Men’s College Basketball tournament offers a contrast to most sporting events because there are several micro-events occurring at different sites, and there is greater uncertainty regarding event quality because participating teams are unknown until just days before each...Read more

Brendan Dwyer
Joris Drayer
Stephen L. Shapiro

When purchasing tickets in advance, sports consumers are often faced with uncertainty. Most notably, in today’s real-time environment, it can be challenging for consumers to determine how ticket prices and seat availability will change over time. Guided by the generic advanced-booking decision model, the current study investigated the role of time, ticket source (primary or secondary market), and team identification in advanced ticket purchasing by exploring a consumer’s perceptions of ticket availability and finding a lower price. The results suggest the perceived likelihood of ticket...Read more

Joris Drayer
Stephen L. Shapiro

Previous research has examined the factors that predict the face value of tickets in the primary market. Oftentimes, however, fans place a different value on tickets based on a variety of factors (team success, opponent, day of the week, etc.). The secondary market illustrates fans’ willingness to pay prices that are considerably different from the actual face value of the ticket. This study examined the factors that influenced fans’ perceived value for NFL playoff games during the 2007-2008 season using sell prices on www.ebay.com. Results indicated...Read more

Joris Drayer
David K. Stotlar
Richard L. Irwin

The secondary ticket market includes all ticket transactions where the seller is reselling previously purchased tickets and is not officially affiliated with the league or team associated with the event (Happel & Jennings, 2002). The secondary ticket market, which has grown to a $10-15 billion industry, presents challenges as well as new opportunities for team, event, and league management alike (De Atley, 2004; Fisher, 2005; Lacy, 2005; Stecklow, 2006). For instance, fraud has traditionally been one of the major flaws of the secondary ticket market with the image of “scalpers” selling...Read more