Eric Brownlee
T. Christopher Greenwell
and Anita Moorman

One of the benefits of being an official sponsor is the right to use the term “official sponsor” to differentiate a company’s association with a property from other companies (non-sponsors). Official sponsors may pay a premium for those designations; however, there is uncertainty as to whether or not those designations are effective. This study utilizes scenarios simulating official Major League Baseball (MLB) team sponsorship, official MLB sponsorship, and no official association with MLB or the team to assess the effect of these statuses on purchase intentions. Results from a sample of...Read more

Abdullah Demirel
Janet Fink
and Steve McKelvey

Today, sponsorship is a widely-used marketing communications tool. While consumers’ responses to sponsorship have been extensively studied, little research has been conducted on employees’ responses to a sponsorship. Based in social identity theory, this study addresses this gap by examining sponsorship from the perspective of employees of an organization that sponsors a National Football League (NFL) team. A structural model was developed and tested to examine the relationship between team identification, sponsorship related factors (i.e., perceived fit, sincerity, and benefits to the...Read more

Sarah Jane Kelly
Michael Ireland
John Mangan
and Harley Williamson

Determining the impact of sport sponsorship by alcohol companies has been identified as a priority research concern (World Health Organization, 2014). Despite the vast investment and potential risks, there is almost no sport sponsorship-specific research examining how the choice and behavior of one sponsorship partner affects consumer attitude toward the other partner. We test this relationship, focusing upon the controversial alcohol-sport sponsorship pairing, given its importance to sport management and policy. The findings of these robust experimental results provide the first evidence...Read more

Bridget Satinover Nichols
Joe Cobbs
and David Raska

This paper examines the role of league-cause fit, perceived sincerity, and intentions to support campaigns of league-wide cause-related sport marketing (CRSM). Using the context of the National Football League (NFL) and the tenets of schema theory and social identity theory, we demonstrate potential backlash effects of featuring “hometown” team imagery in league-wide CRSM campaigns. The results of three experiments suggest that while a cause perceived as high fit to the league (Wounded Warrior Project) may facilitate better overall response, fans exposed to campaign imagery featuring their...Read more

An interview with Nicholas Horbaczewski, CEO and founder of the Drone Racing League.Read more

Henry Wear
Bob Heere
and Aaron Clopton

This study examined the effectiveness of sportswear companies’ sponsorship of intercollegiate athletic departments, and the subsequent effects on the students of the university. The value of these sponsorship contracts has grown exponentially, with new contracts averaging $6 million a year per institution (Kish, 2014). However, little research has been devoted to the impact of the relationship between sportswear brands and university students, and it is uncertain what the return on investment of these sponsorships are to the apparel companies, other than media exposure. To examine how...Read more

An interview with Joyce Caron-Mercier, vice president of The Specialized Marketing Group.Read more

An interview with Grant Jostol, Business Data Analyst for the Seattle Mariners.Read more

Dean V. Baim
Levon Goukasian
and Marilyn B. Misch

Using event study methodology, this paper analyzes the capital market behavior related to shares of companies that sponsored the London 2012 Summer Olympic Games. We investigate the existence of abnormal returns and changes in trading volumes on announcement dates for companies at two sponsorship levels—Official Olympic Partners and Official Olympic Supporters. We also test for differential responses between British and non-British firms. We find that London 2012 Olympic sponsorships are associated with statistically significant increased share values for Official Partners as well as for...Read more

Pamela Wicker
Christian Weingärtner
Christoph Breuer
and Helmut Dietl

Choosing the legal structure of a sports institution is one of the key decisions that sports managers must make. Using platform theory and property rights theory, this paper shows that the choice of legal structure influences the revenue composition of sports institutions. We hypothesized that member associations should receive higher sponsorship revenues than private firms because their legal structure offers better protection against hold-up for sponsors and also for customers/members, which in turn leads to increased attention for the sponsor. We tested this prediction using...Read more

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