Sport and Cultural Studies


Fourth Edition | PaperbackeBook

Intercollegiate sport has historically been a source of frustration for and discrimination against African American athletes, coaches, and athletic administrators, and yet is a place of courage and achievement for those who have been given the opportunity to play, coach, and administer college...


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“In an era of such divisiveness, it behooves all of us to consider means by which we can bring people together.”
–Mr. Richard Armitage, Former Deputy Secretary of State for the United States of America 

The growing influence of sport has created a unique opportunity to build...


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Not only was John Wooden a great basketball coach, he was a master teacher. In fact, he was a great coach because he was a master teacher. What Wooden has learned from others in the classroom and perfected on the practice court are fundamental principles of effective teaching, which are conveyed in You Haven’t Taught Until They Have Learned: John Wooden’s Teaching Principles and Practices. Co-author Swen Nater, one of Wooden’s former players at UCLA, provides insightful first-hand accounts on the many life lessons he learned from Wooden that he has applied to his life since becoming a teacher himself. Wooden’s principles conveyed by Nater and co-author Ronald Gallimore in this book can be studied and applied by teachers, coaches, parents, and anyone else who is responsible for, works with, or supervises others.


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This provocative collection brings together some of the leading historians, sociologists, political scientists, and cultural theorists on an ambitious range of topics dealing with sport, diversity and difference. The book is both diverse and inclusive, for it considered race, ethnicity and aboriginality in tandem; too often these themes are segmented into separate studies. The collection features vibrant examples from different eras, places and spaces - wherein co-themes like post-colonialism, gender and media representation are embedded.


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Sport for Development, Peace, and Social Justice goes beyond the individual benefits of sport to look more closely at what sport can offer to groups of people and the communities in which they live. Although the domain of sport development is mostly uncharted, editors Robert Schinke and Stephanie Hanrahan integrate sport development projects from different disciplines to challenge readers to broaden the scope of what they think can be achieved through sport.


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This anthology of essays, previously published in Olympika: The International Journal of Olympic Studies, addresses key themes in the scholarly study of the Games. Part I of Rethinking the Olympics presents seven articles devoted to Olympic history: the Games’ legacy from antiquity, their modern evolution, and the most controversial Games of the modern era, the Berlin Games of 1936. Part II reviews the persistent problems and crises that confounded and defined the Olympic Games over time. The nine essays in this section focus on a variety of issues such as: performance enhancement; the rise of commercialism; enduring controversies in the form of leadership, corruption, and the Cold War; and the politics of hosting Olympic Games. Finally, in Part III, the future of the Modern Olympic Movement is addressed from the perspective of the rapidly accelerating and mushrooming process of globalization.


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The Long Run to Freedom: Sport, Cultures and Identities in South Africa analyzes the meaning attached to sport in South African societies, past and present. It explores the history and changing meanings attached to particular sports in the old and new South Africas, and the ways in which sport is being used in the present. In particular, it examines the prominent team sports of rugby, soccer, and cricket in the creation of social divisions and unities over the course of South African history.

Richard Pringle is an associate professor of socio-cultural studies of sport at the University of Auckland in New Zealand.

Dr. Murray Phillips teaches the history of sport in the School of Human Movement Studies at the University of Queensland in Australia.

Richard Lapchick is often described as “the racial conscience of sport.” He is the DeVos Eminent Scholar Chair and Director of the Sport Business Management Graduate Program in the College of Business Administration at the University of Central Florida.

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